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Our Mission: Why we started Rogue

We are challenging the expectation that once diagnosed with Parkinson's, an individual should expect to decline for the rest of their life.

In our experience, individuals participating in regular exercise can improve and defy these expectations.

We all need the right surroundings to thrive and reach our full potential, and that is why we created Rogue: To provide an environment that includes education, improved health and fitness through exercise, hope, inspiration and support.

Parkinson's research indicates that intense, frequent exercise over the course of a few months is necessary to see improvements.  We’ve helped people with Parkinson's improve their physical abilities and make progress towards their goals through this very approach. 

Exercise As Medicine

Exercise should be recommended the way medication is prescribed:

·      Indication: what type of exercise is needed to improve the symptom/problem?

·      Dosage: How much exercise is the right amount, how intense?

·      Frequency: How often should the treatment be administered?  

·      Duration: Is this a short term treatment or a lifestyle change?

Rogue’s components for success are:

1.    Work closely with your neurologist to get optimally medicated.

2.    Begin an exercise program.  Some may choose to start with a class, others may benefit from individual physical therapy first.

3.    Make dietary changes to improve digestion, medication absorption and overall health. 

4.    Optimize sleep so that you feel well rested the next day. Sleep is an important time for your brain to refresh, encode learning from that day and prepare for more challenges!

5.    Learn as much as you can about Parkinson’s, so you can advocate for yourself. 

6.    Seek out other resources and team members. Examples are Occupational Therapist, Speech Therapist, Neuropsychologist, Dietician, Pelvic Floor Physical Therapist, support groups etc.  Exercise classes can be a great source of camaraderie, other people in the class understand what you are experiencing, and everyone in the class is taking a proactive approach to improve their health! The list goes on! It can be overwhelming; we are here to help!

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How is Rogue different?

"There are only a few people in this world who can really positively change the course of your life, Claire is one of them! She has relentless focus and determination to feed our minds, souls and bodies in ways that allow us to grow into the best we can be!"

— Ann DiLuzio, PWP and class member

 

Claire McLean PT, DPT, NCS

"I believe people with Parkinsons can get better and improve their health through exercise because I see it happen on a regular basis."

Education and Experience

-Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the University of Michigan
-Doctorate in Physical Therapy from the University of Southern California (USC)
-Neurologic residency through USC  & Rancho Los Amigos

It was during Claire’s residency that she found her passion for working with individuals with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders.

Claire’s physical therapy education at USC exposed her to the potential for activity-dependent neuroplasticity with individuals with Parkinson's.  One of Claire's mentors is Dr. Beth Fisher, a pioneer in physical therapy and exercise research for individuals with Parkinson's. Claire also participated in NIH funded research and achieved her LSVT BIG certification with noted neuroscientist and physical therapist, Becky Farley.

Exposure to these pioneering concepts demonstrated that people with Parkinson’s could improve through intensive, aerobic and skill-based exercise.  In her 10+ practical years’ working with patients, Claire has experienced the amazing improvements that are possible for the Parkinson's community.  

Claire continues to work closely with PWR! (Parkinson Wellness Recovery) including teaches PWR! courses to both therapists and fitness professionals internationally and has continued her passion and calling to be at the forefront of Parkinson’s research.

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